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Posts Tagged ‘Ashkan Sadri’

What being a breast cancer researcher has taught me.

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Hello! My name is Ashkan Sadri and I’m a Masters candidate in Dr. Alison Allan’s lab in the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology at Western University, just coming to the conclusion of my thesis research.

When I engage in casual conversation, the topic of graduate school and breast cancer research often arise. By far, the most common question I’m asked is: “Does a cure exist?” And to that, it’s hard to give a simple answer.

Ashkan Sadri, BCSC ResearcherWhat is difficult to communicate to those outside of the cancer research field is that, due to the complexity of cancer, it is unlikely a single cure exists. Over the past two years, the basis of my research has been to investigate whether the factors produced by different organs in the body such as bones and the lungs can promote a rare, stem-like population of breast cancer cells with heightened capacity to form metastatic tumors in these organs. Our research findings turned out to challenge our predictions, providing an important means for thinking outside of the box. Not only were the stem-like traits of breast cancer cells not promoted when exposed to the lung microenvironment, they were actually reduced. We have gone on to identify a novel subpopulation of breast cancer cells that may potentially be involved in metastasis to the lung, using pathways that are distinct from the original cancer stem cell model. Thus, when asked, about a “cure to cancer”, it’s important to consider the complex nature of cancer biology and the many unknowns that exist, emphasizing the need for valuable research to be conducted.

When confronted with a treatment, breast cancer cells often find alternative means to progress along their path. Cancer treatments are effective in blocking key pathways, but alternative routes exist that the cancer cells can utilize. This is why supporting breast cancer research is vital. Learning about different mechanisms that drive tumour development are necessary to finally get breast cancer under control. By supporting breast cancer research, researchers are able to make a global impact when it comes to gaining ground on cancer.

Thank you to BCSC for your trainee support!

– Ashkan Sadri

Pamela Greenaway-Kohlmeier Translational Breast Cancer Research Unit, London Health Sciences Centre

Support researchers like Ashkan and others by considering a donation to the Breast Cancer Society of Canada. Find out how you can help fund life-saving research, visit bcsc.ca/donate

 

Presenting, Learning, and Engaging

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The value in attending a professional cancer research conference

Hello! My name is Ashkan Sadri and I’m a Masters candidate in Dr. Alison Allan’s lab in the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology at Western University.

Ashkan Research Blog Since my last blog post, I’ve been fully immersed in the world of research (quite literally). Recently, I was afforded the opportunity to attend the annual American Association of Cancer Research (AACR) conference held in Washington D.C. Being the world’s oldest and largest professional association related to cancer research, I surely had plenty of relevant information that I was able to digest, understand and utilize towards my own research.

As a refresher, my research focuses on assessing human breast cancer spread (metastasis) through a cancer stem cell (CSC) perspective. That being said, I am most interested in the potential of the bone and lung microenvironments to promote stem-like traits in human breast cancer cells. Having been granted the opportunity to present my research at the 2017 AACR conference, I successfully communicated our findings to a distinguished audience, all while receiving valuable information that I am incorporating into my research at this very moment. Further, it was remarkable to witness on an international scale the collaborative efforts that cancer researchers are putting forward to better understand, diagnose, and treat breast-specific and other cancers.

Although a bit overwhelming at times, this conference helped truly put into perspective how important our benchtop research is when it comes to understanding the complicated nature of breast cancer. I am extremely fortunate to have attended such a renowned meeting through the support of BCSC and the Allan lab. Departing for the conference as a rather naïve research student, I returned with a strong sense of enthusiasm about my research and a lengthy list of information/literature to follow-up on.

Thank you to BCSC for your trainee support!

– Ashkan Sadri

Pamela Greenaway-Kohlmeier Translational Breast Cancer Research Unit, London Health Sciences Centre

Cancer stem cells: a unique approach to assessing breast cancer metastasis

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Ashkan Sadri

Sadri in the Dept. of Anatomy and Cell Biology

Hello! My name is Ashkan Sadri and I’m a Masters candidate in the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology at Western University. As a recent addition to Dr. Alison Allan’s lab at London Regional Cancer Program, today marks the first time you’ll be hearing from me!

What most intrigued me about the work conducted in Dr. Allan’s lab was the translational relevance of ongoing projects, but further, their unique approach to assessing human breast cancer spread (metastasis) through a cancer stem cell (CSC) perspective.

Stem cells are best known for their regenerative potential, which coincides with characteristics found in stem-like tumour cells.

Our previous studies have shown that certain breast cancer CSCs preferentially migrate and/or metastasize to the lungs and bones, where secondary tumours can severely impede organ function; the specific role of these organs in promoting metastasis, however, remains poorly understood. This is where I get involved.

Currently, I’m investigating the potential of the bone and lung microenvironments to promote stem-like traits in human breast cancer cells. Understanding how these microenvironments affect tumour cells could hold the key to intervening with breast cancer metastasis and tumour development altogether.

Thank you to BCSC for your trainee support!
– Ashkan Sadri
Pamela Greenaway-Kohlmeier Translational Breast Cancer Research Unit, London Health Sciences Centre